15 years ago
forbidnfruit_420

is appropriate that co-workers constantly hit you up for money for thier childrens school functions?

such as raffle....girl scout cookies...fund raiser....I hate saying no ...feel like a cheapskate.
Top 10 Answers
15 years ago
JenV
If schools and children's organizations are going to continue to solicit money in such a manner (which I really don't feel is appropriate), then parents/children aren't going to be able to raise money for these organizations without soliciting money. Personally, I think it would be more appropriate for these organizations to find other ways to raise money. But I don't see anything inappropriate about soliciting donations at the work place. Just don't feel obligated to contribute if you (1) don't really have the money, (2) don't support the organization or (3) just really don't feel like it. I have always LOVED Girl Scout cookies, although I now feel a little guilty about purchasing them because I realize the local organization makes so little money from them. I wish that schools/organizations such as this that I might like to support would have locally-based fund raisers, maybe a bake sale, so they could keep more of the funds they raise from the event. I do find it much nicer when a co-worker actually brings their child in either after their shift or on a break, so that the child is actually involved in soliciting the funds for their organization. But that's not always practical. And it is rude if a parent tells you that his or her child is looking for a certain level of award for their efforts. You should be donating to the organization because you wish to or because you have a use for the items being sold, not because little Johnny or little Jill wants a prize.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
I think it is wrong for people to use their co-workers to 'sell' junk for their kids. It is a well proven fact that most of the money from the sale of items like Girl Scout cookies ends up in the hands of the executives at those companies and not the actual Girl Scouts. It is the perfect sales scheme, have little girls sell $4 boxes of cookies, give their troup $1 from the sale, pocket $3.
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15 years ago
rrrevils
So, can you not afford the smallest contribution? Or are you really a cheapskate? It is uncool, however, of your coworkers to push their chidlrens' fundraisers. The stuff could be placed in a common area, where everyone could see it and those who wish to participate will and those who don't, well, won't. It will still be obvious that you didn't participate, but at least it won't be "in your face"....smiling. Another thing, in this day and age, children are frequently told to not go door to door to sell their products. The fundraiser instructions are clear on that....they suggest family, friends, and coworkers of Mom and Dad....MORE smiling. If you don't want to, don't....but be strong enough to stand by your decision. Only you can control how you feel....so feel good about it.
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15 years ago
Hockey, Guns & Beer
No, it is not appropriate and a good office manager or HR department would have a policy about that in the office. There is no crime in saying no. They are the ones being rude by constantly pushing this garbage on you. If you want to be polite, food items are the easiest to get out of, simply say "I can't, I am on a diet" and there you go. No woman would press the issue after that.
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15 years ago
babalu2
I feel the same way and I'm the one that has to approach my co-workers for their contributions to these events :( I don't like to bother them, but I respond in kind when they need help. So, in the big picture it all evens out. Try to keep in mind that you are helping other people. Maybe let your co-workers know (one-on-one) that you'll only be able to participate in one fund raiser a year for each employee. That would be fair. Sooner or later, you'll need their help too.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
Putting up a sign up sheet in the break room for your kids doesn't teach the kids anything about responsibility and that is what they should be learning. We always had are kids go to the people they knew and they learned about doing things for themselves and responsiblitity. We never put sign up sheets in the break room for our kids functions. I do not sign up for anything nor do I buy anything from the parent if the child comes over to our house and they are selling something we consider wiorthwhile we will buy otherwise we say not interested. Don't be afraid to say no. They are counting on you feeling bad so you will buy out of the quilt factor.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
As much as it's a waste of money, a lot of people do this at work because they figure they'd put you on the spot by asking you to contribute to a cause and if you refuse, make you look bad in front of co-workers. They do it all the time at my work place, including raffles and charity work and sales... it's annoying and def. not appropriate.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
The parents are doing the child's work! I know what you mean about all the fund raisers! It gets to be too much at times. I always say I gave at my grandsons school!
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15 years ago
Anonymous
I don't mind it, but I have a child selling stuff too. I never took anything she was selling to work until other parents brought their child's stuff and asked me about it. I then purchased a little something and told them I'd be seeing them when my child was selling. So, that's what we did. We (the parents) sold to each other. I never bothered anyone else. They could see what was going on and if they were interested they could come over and ask to see it. I don't think anyone should be offended if you decline to purchase something. Most of that stuff is way overpriced and semi-useless. They've heard "no" from more people than just you. Don't worry about it. You'd go broke if you bought from everyone. (-:
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