15 years ago
lion_tiger182

Is that common in spoken American English?

1. It don't figure, Eddie. They're so small. (here: they used don't instead of doesn't) 2. You got long arms. ( here: they used got instead of have or have got) 3. I don't got a picture. (here: they used got instead of don't have or haven't got) 4. Today ain't your lucky day, eh, shorty-pants?( here: they used shorty-pants instead of shorty or short-ar.se) most of the sentences above are from the movie baby's day out. Can someone explain that to me?
Top 8 Answers
15 years ago
Froggiesmiles
Favorite Answer
nobody speaks perfect english, thats sort of a rougher version of it
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15 years ago
quatt47
The examples you give are 'slang' and incorrect grammatically. They are also described as vernacular, in other words how people speak to each other in an informal way. In the context of the film the characters so speaking would probably look out of place if they said. 'It doesn't make sense Eddie. They're so small.' 'You have long arms' I don't have a picture.' 'Today is not your lucky day is it, short person?'
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15 years ago
Anonymous
You have given examples of colloquial speech. This is not considered proper English to educated Americans either, though many use such terms in common informal speech as compared to formal speech or the written word.
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15 years ago
Jenny
For most people the last 2, and the 1st one are not true only some people speak like that.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
It's partly dialectic, common to the South and Southwest, but sometimes used in other places when the person is lazy or stupid.
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15 years ago
Anonymous
Bad grammar, yes. But that's the way uneducated people speak sometimes.
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15 years ago
Jason S
Can you explain what the h--- you're doing watching Baby's Day Out?
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15 years ago
undercovernudist
its slang and yes spoken english is a little different then written
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