13 years ago
meghanguyette

how do i train a dog to stop chewing up everything?

my dog chews up everything we give her..a bed, toys..even the furniture..HELP!!
Top 10 Answers
13 years ago
laughing
Favorite Answer
-Sorry that it's so long, but if you read it all the way through I guarentee it will work! Just be patient with me! Lol!- This is really hard, honestly. A dog lives for the moment. Which means, if you correct them, it's what they're doing right then that they find wrong. Which then means if you catch your dog chewing on her dog bed, and you correct her for chewing, she'll think, "Oh, I'm not allowed to chew on my BED." She won't understand you mean no chewing at all. So then she'll go chewing on the sofa, thinking it is perfectly acceptable. You catch her then and correct her, now she knows chewing on her bed and on that end of the sofa is wrong. But she may not understand chewing the sofa altogether is wrong, she may just think she's not allowed to chew that particular area of the sofa. See where I'm getting at? Dogs are fine to chew their toys, it should be greatly encouraged. It is a natural thing for dogs to chew, you can't stop them! It's just a fact. They are born predators, which means chewing, growling, barking, and chasing are all natural born instincts! If you catch her chewing on something, give her a sharp "Eh eh" or an "Aaaattt". A pack leader isn't loud, and doesn't use a lot of verbal commands. So when you say this, you should make it in a normal tone, just with a demanding sound that says, "I mean business". You should stand tall with your shoulders square and you should give off a feeling of you're big and you are the leader here. Think in you're head that you have control of this situation and that you're big. Dogs don't see things as humans do, they go by smell and the feeling of energy. Hearing and sight are often last on their list of how they evaluate something. Part of why the pack leader is silent. I suggest you watch your dog closely for awhile and make sure you've established yourself as pack leader so your dog will obey you better. You need to correct your dog when she is in the action. You cannot correct after it has happened. The best time to correct is when you see her ABOUT to chew, so she understands it is the chewing part you don't allow. If you see her chewing, still correct her. But if you walk into a room and she's found a nice spot on your chair to chew on, and she sees you and stops, you can't correct! She won't know you mean the chewing because she isn't in the action of it! If you see her chewing, correct her, then give her something appropriate to chew and encourage her to chew that item, instead of your furniture and her beds! You can also look into getting repellant, which you can spray on her favorite places to chew. What repellant does is it has a mixture of spices in it, and you spray it on that item, so when your dog goes to chew on it, the nasty taste of the spices is what they get! Most dogs hate the taste so much, they won't ever go back and touch that furniture! Don't worry--it doesn't harm your dog! This will take a lot of time for the behavior to fully be corrected, but just make sure you have some chews on hand at all times! (Whether it be the stick chews, or if you give her a washcloth with a knot tied in it, or just a toy ball). Watch her like a hawk (except don't follow her around, pack members follow the leader so if you're following her, she'll believe she's the pack leader) and when you see her start to chew, give her a correction and you can even give her a "bite" (your hand grabs the side of her neck like a claw, just as a pack leader would do) if she isn't listening well. Then give her something appropriate to chew and allow her to chew on that. Make sure there is always things around the house for her to chew on that is appropriate, so her chewing won't be directed elsewhere. Lastly, is she receiving enough exercise? Excessive chewing is a sign of distress and lack of exercise. If she is a medium-large breed or a terrier breed, you may want to consider taking her out more to get more play time and exercise time! If she's a breed that is usually a less active breed, just add another 10 minutes of walking time to see if that helps at all. If the extra exercise doesn't help at all, oh well! At least you're getting out more, right?
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13 years ago
somethingelse
You should provide something safe to chew on ; a rawhide chew for instance (ask at the pet store) . Keep the dog in a crate when it is not being exercised, trained , played with or supervised well. This can be very dangerous for you dog! If it chews up it's bedding in the crate leave it out for a few days but make sure it has a chew toy or bone. Hope this helps.
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13 years ago
devistatinglywonderful
First, never hit your dog, it will make it afraid of you. You must be there and replace whatever your dog is chewing with something he can chew. Every time. And walks are so important to burn off energy. You can make a shaker and every time you see the dog chewing something he is not suppose to, shake it loudly near him. But don't hit your dog. If it was a puppy, you could grab it by the back of the neck and gently shake it and growl, and take the thing he's chewing away, saying no, at the same time. Crate your dog if your not home.
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6 years ago
Anonymous
Hi, I understand that you are looking for some advice or resources to help fully train your dog or fix behavior problems. If a professional dog trainer is not an option at this time, or if you want to trt training your dog on your own (a great way to bond), I'd suggest you https://bitly.im/aLZl1 A friend recommened it to me a few years ago, and I was amazed how quickly it worked, which is why I recommend it to others. The dog training academy also has as an excellent home training course.
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13 years ago
Anonymous
Like many undesirable canine behaviors, destructive habits usually develop because a dog is bored, lonely, or both. It's not fair or realistic to expect your dog--especially a working breed --to spend long hours quietly sitting and waiting for your return. By nature dogs are curious and sentient beings; see that she has enough mental and physical stimulation to minimize the impulse to dig and chew. Here's how to stop your dog from chewing http://dogtime.com/chewing-digging-behavior.html
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13 years ago
Lina
You never never hit an animal. A firm "NO" at that MOMENT will do. Abuse/hitting only makes them threatened and afraid. Which will only lead to aggression. You are their owner and they look to you for love and resources to live. Not abuse which teaches NOTHING. Despite what that person said. You need to be supplying chew toys, try pull toys too, so she can tug on it with you interacting with her/him.. and make sure she gets the idea of what to do such as encourage playing so she is not bored, since clearly she/he is. Take her/him on more walks too.
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13 years ago
Asia R
every time the dog chews something put it up to its nose let them sniff it and give them a pluck on the nose it worked with a lot of dags and probably with yours too if not your screwed
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13 years ago
mzqueenxox
when she starts to chew something hit her and say bad dog,dont hit her extremley hard but hard enough and say bad dog, it worked for me because my dog use to chew on shoes
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13 years ago
commonsense
He'll grow out of it, I have three labs. You can roll up a newspaper and swat him with it when you catch him in the act. Eventually he'll get the picture.
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13 years ago
Animal♥ver:]
call the dog whisperer
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